At par with the calories

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Mugove Chigada
It’s a Wednesday evening at Chapman Golf Club.
An engineer, doctor and two business executives chat long after the last hole. They give the impression the 19th hole, with jar in hand, is all that matters. The temptation to grab one is obviously too much. I gladly join.
It’s apparent they have more to chew. They tease each other about the bad holes on the course and finally get lost into other business and social issues.
“We talk on the course but then now, the mind is more relaxed. And you get to exhaust all issues,” said one of the professionals.
Now here is the thing about most amateur golf players with no aim to turn professional.
Some play to meet those that matter to their business, some for the love of golf and some as a way of branding.
And then there is what is important to most of them, burning the calories.
The fear though is most of them — when the jar finally takes over at the end — tend to add to the body exactly what is lost on the course.
Director of the Rose Centre for Health and Sports Sciences in Denver, Neil Wolkodoff’s study, also cited by Golf Montly last year, attempts to answer how many calories a golfer burns and how many he or she adds with the wise waters.
“He conducted an experiment with eight male golfers, aged 26 to 61 with handicaps between 2 and 17. Over nine holes he found that these golfers burned an average of 721 calories carrying a bag, and 718 when using a trolley.
“To put all this calorie burning in context: a standard glass (175ml) of 12 percent wine contains 126 calories and a pint of 5 percent strength beer has 215 calories.
“This means after a healthy walk around 18 holes you can have a long sit down with a jar or two in the 19th hole and still end up well in credit on the calories front,” Golf concluded.
And if the study is anything to go by, it means a golfer can come out worse off after the 19th hole.
But could there be another way to lose more calories on the course to cushion yourself against any “unforeseen jars”?
Increasing the time on the course could be one of the solutions.
One of the factors that determines how long you spend on the course is the number of players in a group, something that GOLFERFX also supports.
“If one is playing alone the time taken is the least but as the number of players increases as in a two ball, a three ball or a four-ball, the time taken to finish the game increases proportionately.
“If only two golfers are playing they may end up finishing the entire game in as less as two hours. The waiting time is taken for each player to finish his turn at each hole increases when there are more number of players,” they state.
Other factors have to do with the players’ handicap in the group and the hazards on the course. The tougher and more time consuming, the more you come out the biggest loser as it were.
So that particular evening, the good doctor amongst us could not be left out, but stayed true to his water.
What a way to stay in credit and wrap up your Wednesday afternoon!

Feedback: Email — chigadam@gmail.com.Twitter — @mugovechigada.

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